Feel the good old Japan with dagashi snacks

HOME > DISCOVER × TOKYO > DISCOVER YOUR SPECIAL SWEETS > Feel the good old Japan with dagashi snacks

Main content starts here.

Discover Your Special SweetsBack to Discover × Tokyo

Feel the good old Japan with dagashi snacks

Dagashi snacks make up a type of traditional Japanese confectionery. Originally, they were a source of delight for every child, costing only several tens of yen per piece and produced in innumerable varieties. With time, though, dagashi shops faded in number and became a precious rarity. Let’s look at some dagashi-related spots that invite you to travel through time back to the good old Japan.

* The charges and prices given include consumption tax (as of February 2015).
Note that prices are subject to change for various reasons.

Edoya (Daiba 1-chome Shotengai)

Decks Tokyo Beach is a popular shopping mall in the Daiba area. The Seaside Mall, on the fourth floor, resembles a shopping street, lined with 14 tenants selling toys, sundries, and accessories. Edoya is one of them. The shelves are packed with an astonishing array of products, from dagashi snacks to toys and nostalgic game consoles. The biggest attraction is candy sold by weight (200 yen and up per 100 grams). Choose from a spectrum of flavors including soda pop and cola.

Address Decks Tokyo Beach Seaside Mall 4F, 1-6-1 Daiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo
Access 3-min. walk from Yurikamome Odaiba-kaihinkoen Station
Hours 11:00~21:00
Closing days None
Languages Japanese only
Contact information Decks Tokyo Beach::
03-3599-6500
URL http://odaiba-decks.com/shopping/category/cat3/(External link) (Japanese)
 

Dagashi-ya Inuzuka

Inuzuka is a dagashi shop run for the past 30 years by Mr. Hiroshi Inuzuka and his wife, Misako. They carry some 500 varieties of dagashi starting at only 6 yen apiece and entertain flocks of neighborhood children every day when school lets out. The lineup of 200 toys includes Sanrio goods (now famous for Hello Kitty) and pictures of pop idols. And the shop’s symbol set up outside, a bear-shaped cotton candy machine, is old and yet in perfect working order. Customers are welcome to help themselves (100 yen per try).

Address 5-9-15 Higashi Oi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo
Access 5-min. walk from JR Keihin-Tohoku Line / Rinkai Line / Tokyu Oimachi Line Oimachi Station
Hours 10:00~19:30
Saturday and Sunday 10:00~19:00
Closing days Tuesday
Languages Japanese only
Contact information 03-3471-0765

Ikebukuro Dagashi Bar

Ikebukuro Dagashi Bar reproduces the good old Japanese townscape from the 1950s and ‘60s. It features an all-you-can-eat dagashi corner stocked with more than a hundred varieties of snacks, and serves nostalgic dishes like fried dough, once a standard item on school menus. The biggest seller is Dagashiyaki, which resembles takoyaki dumplings but contains dagashi instead of octopus (included in the 3,500 yen party course available for groups of four or more). Customers are brought a takoyaki pan and have the pleasure of cooking the ball-shaped snacks themselves. Dagashi Bar runs three other outlets in Tokyo.

Address Edohan 3rd. Bldg. 2F, 1-24-9 Nishi Ikebukuro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo
Access 3-min. walk from JR / Tokyo Metro Yurakucho Line / Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin Line / Seibu Ikebukuro Line / Tobu Tojo Line Ikebukuro Station
Hours 17:00–24:00 (last order 23:00) Friday, Saturday, and before holidays 17:00–4:30 the following morning (last order 3:30)
Closing days None
Languages Japanese only
Contact information 03-3981-8713
URL http://www.dagashi-bar.com/(External link)(Japanese)

Back issues

SEARCH GO TOKYO